Washington State History Museum and Research Center are closed through December 14, 2020 per directives from the Office of the Governor related to COVID-19. Close
15th Annual  IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 2

15th Annual
IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts

Virtual Exhibition
  • Dates:
    Jul 16 - Oct 25 2020
  • Ages:
    All ages.
  • Where:
    Virtual exhibition.
  • Tickets:

    Free virtual exhibition.

  • Accessibility:

    Accessible online.

15th Annual <br> In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual ExhibitionIn 2006, the Washington State Historical Society and the “House of Welcome” Longhouse Education and Cultural Center at Evergreen State College began a partnership with the intention of celebrating the best emerging contemporary Native art in the region and providing a venue for an annual exhibition that would highlight the efforts of these artists juried by experts in the field. The result was the first In the Spirit: Contemporary Native Arts exhibition.

Over time, this annual exhibition has become an established regional event featuring works from new and established artists, alike and while the Longhouse has gone on to expand their own Native arts endeavors, they continue to have a valued presence in the legacy that was created for the IN THE SPIRIT exhibition and companion festival.

The 15th Annual IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts exhibition was held virtually (the History Museum was closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic). Click the links above to see the 24 works of art and to learn more about the artists. Many of these works are available for purchase and the artist’s contact information is included with their statements. 

2020 IN THE SPIRIT Artist Awards

We also invite you to read statements (below) from two of this year’s jurors.


Todd Clark:

“During these troubled times it would be easy to dismiss art as non-essential, and to an extent, this is understandable. But, then again, if life imitates art, perhaps art can help lift us and point us to a better future? For me, the arts do just that and exhibitions such as IN THE SPIRIT play a major role in grounding me, connecting me with my Native heritage and instilling hope.

“It was contemporary Native artists who first showed me what it looked like to be Native and living in the 21st century, where we retained our past, heritage and culture, and yet thrived in the modern world.

“This is the power of art to me, so when one by one, all of my cherished events from Canoe Journey to SWAIA Indian Market got cancelled, I saw only dark clouds on the horizon. As painful as this was, I understood, but 2020 looked to be a year entirely void of arts and culture. Then I received word that IN THE SPIRIT would go on, maybe later in the year, maybe virtual, but it was going to happen.

“I now had something to look forward to, something to take my mind off of the news of the day, even if only temporarily, but more importantly it was an opportunity for Native artists to once again show their work. And they did not disappoint!”

 

Charles W Bloomfield:

“One of the absolute joys of contemporary art, and contemporary Native American art specifically, is its ability to thrust current issues forward into the spotlight. Contemporary Native American art is not created in a vacuum, it’s created with the implications of life on the artist’s mind, shoulders and spirit. The amazing pieces in this show highlight what is happening in Indian Country, nationally and globally. This exhibition of contemporary Native American art is only but a beautiful fraction of the work Native artists create daily. The pieces in this exhibit were selected not only due to their outstanding craftsmanship, technique, expression through the selection of materials used but also due to the power and voice of their message. These wonderful artists are sharing their thoughts, ideas, heart and vision with us viewers therefore it’s our responsibility to look beyond what it is WE see and understand. It’s our responsibility as viewers to understand and feel the message the artist is expressing. With that in mind, I ask that you view these pieces with a good heart, open mind, empathetic nature and sincere spirit.”

This year’s exhibition was juried by the following individuals:

Todd Clark (Wailaki), the founder and curator of IMNDN, a non-profit organization advocating for contemporary Native art and artists, and a program manager at the University of Washington’s Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies, overseeing initiatives to help recruit, support and retain Native and Indigenous students

Miranda Belarde-Lewis (Zuni/Tlingit), an independent curator and Assistant Professor of North American Indigenous Knowledge at the University of Washington’s iSchool

Charles W Bloomfield (Pyramid Lake Paiute), who has exhibited and won awards in previous iterations of IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts, and participated in the culminating event, the annual In The Spirit Northwest Native Festival and Arts Market

Our thanks to the jurors and to the members of the IN THE SPIRIT advisory committee for their support of the exhibition and related programming.

 

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 32

The IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts exhibition, along with the Northwest Native Festival and Arts Market, embody WSHS’s mission of partnering with our communities to explore how history connects us all. IN THE SPIRIT is supported in part by the Tacoma Arts Commission, South Sound Magazine, The Norcliffe Foundation, and Humanities Washington. Find out more at InTheSpiritArts.org.


The Washington State Historical Society would like to acknowledge that our buildings are located on the traditional lands of the Puyallup People who have stewarded this land throughout the generations. We pay respect to their elders past and present.

 

  • Jim Stritzel / 2 Bear

    British Columbia Metis Federation 

    Something More, 2020

    copper

    50.25×42 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition
  • Chholing Taha

    Cree First Nations

    Lost Birds Returning, 2018

    wool, silk, ultrasuede, brass bells, glass crystals

    46×54 inches

     

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 2
  • RYAN! Feddersen

    Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

    Two Birds Both Dead, 2019

    glass

    13.75×7 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 3
  • RYAN! Feddersen

    Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

    Coyote Restored in Starlight, 2019

    glass

    12×11 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 4
  • Peter Boome

    Upper Skagit

    Prayer Rattles (female, male), 2019

    hand carved from reclaimed yellow cedar, with glass inlay, horsehair, deer hooves, sea shells, sitting in hand carved basket stands from yellow cedar and cottonwood root, with acrylic paint

    15×4×5 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 15
  • Peter Boome

    Upper Skagit

    sunshine on the mountains, 2020

    acrylic paint on canvas

    24×36 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 21
  • Shawn Brigman

    Spokane Tribe of Indians

    Salishan Sturgeon Nose Canoe Column, 2019

    blown and hot-sculpted colored glass

    26×5×5 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 27
  • Kurt Poste

    Squaxin Island Tribe

    basic cedar hat (low tier), 2020

    cedar bark (red)

    7.75× 6.5×12.5 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 6
  • Micah McCarty

    Makah

    Sign of the Time, 2020

    elder red cedar, horse hair, acrylic, graphite PPE

    11×7 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 19
  • Lily Hope

    Tlingit

    Chilkat Protector, 2020

    Chilkat weaving on thigh-spun merino and cedar bark warp, merino weft yarns, tin cones, and ermine tails

    7×7.5×.25 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 10
  • Jeffrey Veregge

    Port Gamble S’Klallam

    Gentleman George, 2020

    digital Giclee canvas

    36×36×2 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 13
  • Kelli D. Palmer

    Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

    Blue Corn Husk Hat with Feather Design, 2020

    hemp strings, dried corn husk, rayon raffia, cotton fabric with beads and shell accent

    9×10 inches (25 inches diameter)

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 8
  • Dan Friday

    Lummi

    Owl Totem, 2020

    hand-sculpted glass

    17×4×6 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 14
  • Dan Friday

    Lummi

    Forager Totem, 2020

    hand-sculpted hot glass

    27×7×7 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 12
  • George A. Zantua

    Tlingit and Haida

    Spirit Quest, 2020

    acrylic on canvas

    18.5×14.5 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 20
  • Matika Wilbur

    Tulalip

    Wilson Mungnak Hoogerdorn and Oliver Tusagvik, Inupiaq, 2019

    photograph on Mahnemuhle fine art paper

    20×24 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 28
  • Carol Emarthle Douglas

    Northern Arapaho

    Twenty-Nine, 2019

    traditional coiled basket/single hemp cord foundation, 4-ply waxed linen threads

    6×11×11 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 22
  • Carol Emarthle Douglas

    Northern Arapaho

    Buffalo Thunder, 2020

    1 mm round reed core, natural & dyed raffia, beading thread

    1.5×1.5×2 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 9
  • Quentin DeCoteau

    Jamestown S’Klallam

    Beautiful Day, 2019

    ink on vellum paper, matted and framed

    20×26×32.8 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 7
  • Jennifer Wood

    Yup’ik

    Rising Waters, 2019

    basswood, gel medium, pigments, bone beads, seed beads, lava stone beads

    16×9×2 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 17
  • Tony Boyd

    Colville

    Crow, 2020

    framed print

    24×33 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 11
  • Denise Emerson

    Navajo and Skokomish enrolled

    Ancestors, 2020

    plexiglass

    17×18 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 5
  • Linley B. Logan

    Onondowaga (also known as Seneca Nation)

    Wolf with Lipstick Rattle, 2019

    recycled materials

    4×3×22 inches

    2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 24
  • Cynthia Masterson

    Comanche Nation of Oklahoma

    Recipe For A Quarantine, 2020

    Czech glass beads, Swarovski crystals, iPad, found household objects

    12.5×24×20 inches

     

    15th Annual  IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 4

Artist Statements

Jim Stritzel/2 Bear, Something More

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition

Jim Stritzel / 2 Bear
British Columbia Metis Federation
Something More, 2020
copper
50.25×42 inches

“Symbol of pebble dropped in water is common in Coast Salish art. Here Rain Drops on Salish Sea becomes symbol.

“Felt was ‘Something More’ in symbol. Doing work revealed Rain Drops are Salish Sea transformative Circle of Life gift by Raven.

“Raven’s fresh water gift in Creation time evaporates. Rising, falling right back as Rain Drops or falls on land as rain/snow. Flowing back, recreating Salish Sea after nourishing land, plants, animals (including two-leggeds).

“Words, thoughts heard/dreamed from work in progress:

“Rain Drops…..Salish Sea
Calming…..Balance
Ancestors…..Calling
Journey…..Within”

“Waves alive -undulating, heaving, troughing, yawing, blending Rain Drops into Salish Sea transformation.

“Rain Drops have darkened center. Inviting one to ‘Journey Within’ Salish Sea and oneself.

“Work all hand done. No power tools used.

“Respectful thanks to Salish Elders who gave permission to work in their style.

“Also to Puyallup Nation for stewardship of land for untold generations where IN THE SPIRIT occurs.”

Chholing Taha, Lost Birds Returning

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 2

Chholing Taha
Cree First Nations
Lost Birds Returning, 2018
wool, silk, ultrasuede, brass bells, glass crystals
46×54 inches

“Our awareness of the tragedy of murdered and missing Indigenous women has at last been given the the public awareness that is so needed. Crises need to be unveiled, but also action is required after the initial shock, seeing this is real, is very important. Here I address the critical action necessary from communities/families/friends to welcome home the lost birds in Indian Country. Whether the Sister is alive, still missing, or has moved on from this life, this shawl welcomes them all within its woolen arms.”

RYAN! Feddersen, Two Birds Both Dead & Coyote Restored in Starlight

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 3RYAN! Feddersen
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation
Two Birds Both Dead, 2019
glass
13.75×7 inches

RYAN! Feddersen
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation
Coyote Restored in Starlight, 2019
glass
12×11 inches

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 4“In my art practice, I utilize traditional Plateau storytelling applied to contemporary issues, historical research, and digital tools, to create material applications which interrogate official histories, examining how what we think has been formed by the information we have been taught. I explore creative strategies to activate participation through interactive materials, crowd sourced content, and social practice. These approaches enable my work to start conversations about a broad spectrum of subjects by offering opportunities for interaction and introspection.”

To find out more:

Website: ryanfeddersen.com 

Instagram: @ryanfeddersen  

Peter Boome, Prayer Rattles (female, male) & sunshine on the mountains

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 15Peter Boome
Upper Skagit
Prayer Rattles (female, male), 2019
hand carved from reclaimed yellow cedar, with glass inlay, horsehair, deer hooves, sea shells, sitting in hand carved basket stands from yellow cedar and cottonwood root, with acrylic paint
15×4×5 inches

Peter Boome
Upper Skagit
2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 21sunshine on the mountains, 2020
acrylic paint on canvas
24×36 inches

“Art is everywhere, lines, curves, shapes, and colors, surround us. I am a Coast Salish Artist. My art is rooted in a historical design tradition which is a direct reflection of my culture; it is also a reflection of my personal, cultural, and spiritual world view. I believe art influences and guides us in many directions. If you accept that art and culture are intrinsically connected you realize that art, like culture is malleable, while based on a historic foundation both continue to evolve and expand. Our use and need of art is as strong as our use and need of culture. As an artist representing a distinct culture there is an obligation to carry our artistic tradition with utmost care and respect, by honoring the past, representing the present, and laying the foundations for the future. My work strives to tell stories of our past, present and future.”

To find out more:

Website: araquindesigns.com

 

Shawn Brigman, Salishan Sturgeon Nose Canoe Column

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 27Shawn Brigman
Spokane Tribe of Indians
Salishan Sturgeon Nose Canoe Column, 2019
blown and hot-sculpted colored glass
26×5×5 inches

“During my 2019 Indigenous arts residency working with the hot shop team at the Museum of Glass Tacoma, I explored the manifestation of ancestral Plateau village implements through the medium of glass, celebrating their subtle, curved refinements. Plateau village implements like basketry, fish harpoons, horn spoons, and root digging sticks were historically packed into the bark sturgeon-nose canoe for movement on the water to distant root digging grounds in March, and the salmon harvest sites like the historic Kettle Falls fishery beginning in June. I celebrate and highlight this Plateau canoe heritage in glass, manifesting Indigenous village patterns since time immemorial based on family, work, and recreation all linked as one. As a Plateau-specific cultural form, the glass canoe forms represent the marriage patterns, food gathering patterns, Indigenous knowledge, and even a fish for perhaps it was the sturgeon that once inspired the shape and design of the ancestral canoe.”

To find out more:

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 25

Website: shawn-brigman.squarespace.com
Facebook: @shawn.brigman
Instagram: @salishansturgeonnosecanoes

Kurt Poste, basic cedar hat (low tier)

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 6Kurt Poste
Squaxin Island Tribe
basic cedar hat (low tier), 2020
cedar bark (red)
7.75×6.5×12.5 inches

“With the reintroduction of native culture and practices. Sometimes basic teaching premises are discarded for extravagant presentation. This art piece exhibits various bark weaving styles from common plaiting, to intermediate braiding. Visualizing past ancestral times brought an entry level view, without status, class or title. All tying in together one purposefully end goal, Shade-hat.”

Micah McCarty, Sign of the Time

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 19Micah McCarty
Makah
Sign of the Time, 2020
elder red cedar, horse hair, acrylic, graphite PPE
11×7 inches

“Covid-19 mask over Wildwoman Mask, Sign of the Pandemic”

To find out more:

Facebook: @Micah-McCarty-507922293059343/
Twitter: @klaowus

Lily Hope, Chilkat Protector

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 10Lily Hope
Tlingit
Chilkat Protector, 2020
Chilkat weaving on thigh-spun merino and cedar bark warp, merino weft yarns, tin cones, and ermine tails
7×7.5×.25 inches

“Our Chilkat robes woven on the Northwest Coast of Alaska have been worn in ceremony for hundreds of years. For memorials, for naming ceremonies, for celebrations. Our dancing robes record history, chart clan migration and tell stories. Chilkat Protector is recording our history NOW. Telling our story NOW. Charting our future NOW. Bringing past to present.”

To find out more:

Website: www.lilyhope.com
Instagram: @lilyhopeweaver

Jeffrey Veregge, Gentleman George

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 13Jeffrey Veregge
Port Gamble S’Klallam
Gentleman George, 2020
digital Giclee canvas
36×36×2 inches

Gentleman George was inspired by my Great-Uncle Ivan “Ivar” George, who along with many brave men stormed the beach of Normandy; June 6th, 1944, better known to the world as “D-Day”. My Uncle not only survived, but also lived to finish his WWII tour in Western Europe as part of the US Army. In spite of seeing the horrors of war, and coming home to a Washington state county that had many establishments refuse service to him for being Native American, he maintained a great sense of humor, love for family, love for fishing and enjoyed spinning a great tales for his many nieces and nephews through the years. He was the bravest and toughest man I have ever known. He lived to be 88 years old, and I loved him very much.”

To find out more:

Website: www.jeffreyveregge.com
Facebook: @jeffreyveregge

Kelli D. Palmer, Blue Corn Husk Hat with Feather Design

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 8Kelli D. Palmer
Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
Blue Corn Husk Hat with Feather Design, 2020
hemp strings, dried corn husk, rayon raffia, cotton fabric with beads and shell accent
9×10 inches (25 inches diameter)

“For the upcoming year I have been enjoying the ability to just create. Spending a lot of time at home now I find that working on my weaving has been keeping my spirits up. This basket hat represents my freedom to just create.”

Dan Friday, Owl Totem & Forager Totem

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 14Dan Friday
Lummi
Owl Totem, 2020
hand-sculpted glass
17×4×6 inches

Dan Friday
Lummi
Forager Totem, 2020
hand-sculpted hot glass
27×7×7 inches

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 12“Grandpa Joe’s (Joseph Hillaire) totem poles were different, and very contemporary at their time, he had his own style. In a time when many Native peoples were isolated and adapting to their rapidly changing surroundings, Grandpa, with his stories and Totem poles, shared the ways of the Lummi, and Coast Salish people. His poles were notably in the 1962 World’s Fair and in Kobe Japan. Some of his poles still stand today.

“The stories and lines in my Totems are subtle. I often look to personal experience and expression for the themes. I am grateful for my grandfather and his modern approach, it empowers me as I find my way. Our work is different, but a common message is that ‘we are still here.’

“I think anyone who can find their own voice in whatever they do is very lucky.

“Creativity was fostered by my family from an early age. Living without TV and knowing our rich cultural heritage of the Lummi Nation, meant that making things with our hands was a regular activity.

“I typically work with simple themes and forms, and often employ the subtle silhouettes of glass when making my totems. It is a pleasure seeing inanimate objects taking on a life of their own. The more narrative work is usually a personal expression or a means of processing a life event, often with an underlying statement.

“When I saw glass blowing for the first time, it felt as though I grew an inch! That is to say, a huge weight was lifted from my shoulders. I had finally figured out my path. This was no small feat for someone who, as a youth, was rebellious and misguided. Glass altered my life. In spite of my colorful past, and by the grace of a loving community, I found my passion in glass.

“Living as an artist may not be directly saving the world, but perhaps we are saving ourselves and hopefully, in the process, making the world a better place.”

To find out more:

Website: www.fridayglass.com/index.html

George A. Zantua, Spirit Quest

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 20George A. Zantua
Tlingit and Haida
Spirit Quest, 2020
acrylic on canvas
18.5×14.5 inches

“The Great Spirit Bear is known by the Tsimshian, Tlingit and Haida on the Northwest Coast of Canada and Alaska to be a symbol of power, strength, and courage. Through proper song and the Drum, one will come to develop the confidence to assume this strength and courage in one’s quest through life.

“The Spirit Quest painting is a visual representation of this Quest.”

Matika Wilbur, Wilson Mungnak Hoogerdorn and Oliver Tusagvik, Inupiaq

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 28Matika Wilbur
Tulalip
Wilson Mungnak Hoogerdorn and Oliver Tusagvik, Inupiaq, 2019
photograph on Mahnemuhle fine art paper
20×24 inches

“Matika is one of the nation’s leading photographers and founder of Project 562. Project 562 is a multiyear photography project in which Matika journeyed 400,000 miles to capture images of Native Americans from more than 500 sovereign nations, visiting and photographing Indigenous folxs from all 50 states along with South America and New Zealand. The result is an unprecedented repository of images and oral histories that accurately portrays contemporary Native Americans and Indigenous peoples.

“Wilson Mungnak Hoogendorn and Oliver Tusagvik, Inupiaq brothers from Nome, Alaska, were the first to summit North America’s highest peak, Mount Denali, in the 2019 climbing season.

“I asked them how they prepared: ‘Doing hard things,’ Wilson chuckles.

“‘If you’re just constantly doing hard things, it’s a blip upward if you want to go. Do something crazy,’ Oliver explains.

“Wilson agrees, ‘Just doing hard things makes everything easier.’ They recall walking into the ranger station to register to climb and being met with sideways glances.

“‘Are you sure?’ the ranger asked.

“‘Probably because we didn’t look fancy’… Wilson mentions that most of the people that climb have really expensive equipment and many even have sponsorships. Despite doubt, they proceeded to break trail for the 2019 season at the third most prominent and isolated peak on Earth, after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Denali, a kuyokon word that means “high”, “tall”, or “great one” is the highest mountain in North American at 20,310 feet above sea level.

“Oliver turned 22 years old a couple of months after the climb. He just graduated from Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Biology. Wilson is 21 and is attending the University of Alaska Anchorage, majoring in aeronautical studies and recently earned his pilot’s license.”

To find out more: 

Website: matikawilbur.com and www.project562.com
Facebook: @Project562
Instagram: @project_562 and @matikawilbur

Carol Emarthle Douglas, Twenty-Nine & Buffalo Thunder

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 22Carol Emarthle Douglas
Northern Arapaho
Twenty-Nine, 2019
traditional coiled basket/single hemp cord foundation, 4-ply waxed linen threads
6×11×11 inches

Carol Emarthle Douglas
Northern Arapaho
Buffalo Thunder, 2020
1 mm round reed core, natural & dyed raffia, beading thread
1.5×1.5×2 inches

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 9“The coiled basket titled Twenty-Nine brings awareness to the MMIW (Missing Murdered Indigenous Women) movement. The red dresses represent Native American women and the red hands are also a symbol of the movement. Twenty-nine is the statistic that represents the average age women are murdered or missing.”

Website: www.cemarthleart.com
Instagram: @cemarthle

Quentin DeCoteau, Beautiful Day

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 7Quentin DeCoteau
Jamestown S’Klallam
Beautiful Day, 2019
ink on vellum paper, matted and framed
20×26×32.8 inches

Beautiful Day came to be after a particularly nice day at Woodland Park Zoo and a visit to the butterfly exhibit. As we watched the delicate creature fly here and there, the image of this piece developed in my minds eye. I thought to myself, ‘I’ve never seen a butterfly on a rainy day…. they must only come out on beautiful days.'”

Jennifer Wood, Rising Waters

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 17Jennifer Wood
Yup’ik
Rising Waters, 2019
basswood, gel medium, pigments, bone beads, seed beads, lava stone beads
16×9×2 inches

Rising Waters has a meaning which can go one of two ways: the literal dangers and threat of rising waters, especially as our planet warms, or the feeling of one’s own strength and power growing. I’ve been really inspired by the activism of Native people, especially the growing numbers of young people. As many of the issues we face today are associated with water, I see this empowerment as wound up with the waters we rely on.”

To find out more:

Website: https://yupikjen.com/
Instagram: @yupikjen

Tony Boyd, Crow

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 11Tony Boyd
Colville
Crow, 2020
framed print
24×33 inches

“Creation of artwork, I believe, is an attempt to understand a connection of our people, nature, and land and also all that we hold sacred.”

To find out more:

Instagram: @tojoboyd

Denise Emerson, Ancestors

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 5Denise Emerson
Navajo and Skokomish enrolled
Ancestors, 2020
plexiglass
17×18 inches

“After graduating from the UW with a BFA in Graphic Design, I began mapping bead designs in Excel, each cell represents a bead. Along with mapping my designs in Excel, I studied historical photographs of Native people. I view the photographs as ancestors looking at me. The focus of my art is to represent them in today’s world. My interest is representing women, babies, and children.

“My father was Navajo and he taught me that the Navajo tribe is matriarchal. His words have directed me in the interest of representing Native women. These two art pieces are of women I’ve been working on for five years. I create each figure in a separate spreadsheet, and when I feel the images are ready to combine in one spreadsheet, this is when I begin creating the composition. When the composition is finished, I work on color combination. This finishes the art piece.”

To find out more:

Website: https://www.etsy.com/shop/NeeceesAncestralArt
Instagram: @dineskok
Facebook: @denise.emerson.12

Linley B. Logan, Wolf with Lipstick Rattle

2020 In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 24Linley B. Logan
Onondowaga (also known as Seneca Nation)
Wolf with Lipstick Rattle, 2019
recycled materials
4×3×22 inches

“I have a history of being creatively conscientious in incorporating recycled materials like plastic containers in my work. The original Wolf with Lipstick Rattle was made when I attended Puhoro, the 9th International Indigenous Visual Arts gathering hosted at the Turangwaewae Marae outside of Hamilton, New Zealand in November of 2019. I gifted the original rattle to the Turangwaewae Marae community. The rattle sits on a large carved public art piece that was gifted to the Marae community.

“The rattle is made from a New Zealand plastic milk container.

“This is the first rattle I have made using recycled plastic containers.

“As indigenous people, we have always creatively utilized the resources available to us which in pre-contact were natural resources only. We have access to man made resources today, and as an indigenous artist I recognize the value of using all the resources available to me which includes recycling man made waste materials into art.”

To find out more:

Website: https://my.getjealous.com/linleyblogan

Cynthia Masterson, Recipe For A Quarantine

15th Annual <br> IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 4Cynthia Masterson
Comanche Nation of Oklahoma
Recipe For A Quarantine, 2020
Czech glass beads, Swarovski crystals, iPad, found household objects
12.5×24×20 inches

Recipe For A Quarantine reflects my experience during the COVID-19 outbreak in spring 2020. My husband and I are following the stay-at-home orders together in Ballard, Washington.

 

“Each beaded design element is drawn from what is happening around us. The upended world shook me to move away from my usual palette of Comanche colors and design patters I might never have created.

“Much of our time and thoughts revolve around food. Planning, getting, storing, preparing, eating and cleaning up. We never use this whisk and every time I see it in the drawer, I want to bead it.

“I use my iPad often to find recipes and to use Zoom, Facetime, and Facebook. Personal Zoom calls are out of the norm, fun highlights during our confinement. Connecting and re-connecting is entertaining, educational, and essential.

“As of this writing the future is uncertain, but the sun continues to rise.” 15th Annual <br> IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Virtual Exhibition 3

Recipe for: A Quarantine
Serves: Much of the World

Dash of Virus
People – Separated
Zoom – if in season
Lots of time
Cherry Blossoms- bloomed and faded
City Streets
Endless news cycle (optional)
One Homemade Face Mask for each serving

Combine a dash of virus with people. Use caution, a little goes a long way. Infect just a few before physically separating yourself from all the people you know and love. Add Zoom if available. Use the time to take long walks all over your neighborhood and glaze quarantine with wonder from the cherry blossoms. Sprinkle with the amount of news you can tolerate.

Use restraint, some may have adverse reaction.

If quarantine results in your death, toss out entire batch and try again in another lifetime. If quarantine results in another’s death let rest in heartbreak mixed with solitary stunned confusion and try to make sense of it all.

Store quarantine for weeks to months and serve in a homemade face mask.

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